The Multiverse Hypothesis Explained by Brian Cox

The multiverse hypothesis has been gaining ground over the recent years in public discourse. Some even regard the multiverse concept as a valid scientific theory rather than a hypothesis. Brian Cox explains that the multiverse does not only belong in the realm of science fiction. However the lack of physical evidence for the multiverse has accumulated much criticism and some worry it could damage trust of physical sciences in public opinion.

Brian Cox also explains inflationary theory and how it could provide indication that the multiverse exists.
Some scientists are now suggesting that the Big Bang is just one moment in an eternal cycle of cosmic creation and dissolution. Scientists are working on different theories to try and explain how the universe could have come into existence.

The multiverse idea has arisen in many versions, primarily in cosmology, quantum mechanics, and philosophy, and often asserts the actual physical existence of different potential configurations or histories of the known observable universe.

Many modern physicists think about a multiverse in the context of the “many worlds” theory of quantum mechanics. According to this theory, when a particle is measured, it can result in either just one outcome or multiple outcomes. The universe splits into different universes in one of the outcomes. Each being a separate reality. According to Brian Cox, the theory could also answer the question as to why our universe seem to be fine tuned for life.

Multiverse theories have been widely criticized as speculation or philosophy rather than science, which again, is indeed a legitimate concern. Multiverse defenders however, contend that a description of the observable universe as one part of a multiverse can be much simpler than a description of the observable universe as the only universe at all.

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Sources: ”Professor Brian Cox at BETT 2020” by p_a_h is licensed under CC BY 2.0. To view a copy of this license, visit

Exploring Primordial Black Holes from the Multiverse with Optical Telescopes
Alexander Kusenko, Misao Sasaki, Sunao Sugiyama, Masahiro Takada, Volodymyr Takhistov, and Edoardo Vitagliano
Phys. Rev. Lett. 125, 181304 – Published 30 October 2020
https://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.125.181304

In Class with Brian Cox – The Royal Institution of Australia
https://youtu.be/1rQzq5t44Q8
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